EEOC Archives - Parks Chesin & Walbert
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Georgia Legislature Considers New Anti-Discrimination Law

The State of Georgia may have an anti-discrimination law on the books. This legislative session includes the introduction of House Bill 849 titled the “Georgia Civil Rights in Public Accommodations Act.” The Bill was introduced by the chairman of the House Judiciary Non-Civil Committee Rep. Rich Golick and has wide bipartisan support. The Bill would ban businesses from turning away customers based on their race, color, sex, religion or national origin and applies to places of public accommodation including hotels, restaurants, gas stations, entertainment venues and other service industries across the State of Georgia.

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When to Go to Human Resources

Employers typically use their human resources department for: job design and analysis, recruitment and hiring, training and development, performance, compensation, and legal issues. Employees often turn to their HR department when they have a question or a problem. This article focuses on when it is a good idea to take a problem to HR and how to document the communication.

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Discrimination Based on Genetic Information? There’s an Act for That

Seven years ago, Congress passed a law which prohibited employers from discriminating against people with genes that increase their risk for costly diseases. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA” or the “Act”) makes it illegal “for an employer to request, require, or purchase genetic information with respect to an employee.” 42 U.S.C. §2000ff et seq.

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ADA Covers Accommodations Not Tied to Essential Job Duties

The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) prohibits covered employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of disability.  That prohibition requires an employer to provide “reasonable accommodation” to disabled employees, unless doing so would cause undue hardship.  The burden is on the employee to request accommodation and make it known to the employer that the request is for a reason related to the employee’s disability or medical condition.  But the employee need not reference the ADA, use any particular magic language (including the phrase “reasonable accommodation”), or request a specific form of accommodation.  And the burden is on the employer to demonstrate that providing the accommodation would impose undue hardship.

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