employment Archives - Page 2 of 2 - Parks Chesin & Walbert
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Sick and Fired: Medical Leave Does Not Always Protect Your Job

Being sick is the worst… except when being sick means you need to be away from work for an extended period. Then, that is the worst. Many employees worry about taking even one sick day, so the thought of taking a medical leave for weeks – or even months – can be terrifying. What if I lose my job? How will I manage without my benefits?

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Discrimination Based on Genetic Information? There’s an Act for That

Seven years ago, Congress passed a law which prohibited employers from discriminating against people with genes that increase their risk for costly diseases. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA” or the “Act”) makes it illegal “for an employer to request, require, or purchase genetic information with respect to an employee.” 42 U.S.C. §2000ff et seq.

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UPDATE: SCOTUS Rules Abercrombie & Fitch “Look Policy” Violates Title VII

UPDATE: On June 1, 2015, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Petitioner, Samatha Elauf, a seventeen year-old Muslim woman who applied for a job at an Abercrombie Kids store. In an 8-1 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that employers can’t refuse to hire job applicants who require accommodations for their religious beliefs, even if the potential employee has not explicitly requested an accommodation and regardless of whether the employer knows for certain that religious accommodation is needed.

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Social Media In Litigation

Are you one of the 1 billion people who has a Facebook account, or one of the 230 million who use Twitter?  Have you ever thought about how your social media activity could come into play if you found yourself in a lawsuit?  If you answered “no,” you’re not alone.  Many social media users use their accounts to post about work-related matters, never considering the possible ramifications, from being fired for internet speech, to having your own posts used against you, to being sanctioned for deleting social media accounts during litigation.  Social media often takes a starring role during employment litigation, and courts have struggled to keep up with technology, resulting in numerous and often conflicting legal opinions about the relevance, privacy, and burden of producing social networking information.

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Does A Georgia Employer Have To Provide Sick Leave To Employees?

Earlier this week, Jersey City, New Jersey Mayor Steven Fulop signed a city ordinance that requires employers to provide sick leave to their employees with sick time – paid sick time if the employer has 10 or more employees, unpaid sick time for smaller employees at smaller businesses.  You can read the full ordinance here.  Many people have asked why such an ordinance is necessary, assuming that the law already requires employers to allow employees limited time off work when they are sick.

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Five Things You Should Always Tell Your Employment Lawyer

If you are hiring a lawyer in connection with an employment lawsuit, there are certain pieces of information that you will automatically know to tell your lawyer (or your lawyer should know to ask for): where you worked, what kinds of actions you were subjected to, what adverse actions were taken against you, etc.  But there is also information that you won’t tell your lawyer, either because you don’t think about it, or you don’t think it relates to the lawsuit you hired the lawyer to help you with.  Here are five things that you should always tell your lawyer.

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